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Here’s a nice quick reference visual that lays out the major changes taking place in Ohio education from 2010-2016.
What_s Changing in Ohio Education Timeline.pdf - Google Drive

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This morning, Wes Fryer tweeted something that he probably thought was a pretty simple and routine update…

Twitter / Interactions

…but it got me to thinking…

Jeremy Brueck (brueckj23) on Twitter

which lead into a pretty interesting asynchronous conversation that I think I need to document and remember… Read the rest of this entry…

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apps

From the NAEYC ECETech Listserv:

As it takes so much time to locate and evaluate apps, I was wondering:

-Do you have favorite app review sites? (there are so many now, and video reviews cropping up, so people can see apps before they buy them.)

-Do you have a system, and if you do, what is it, for listing your favorite apps to share with others?  Is your favorites list available online/can you share it? I am interested in ways others in the group are organizing this info, and to take a look at your lists, if possible.

-In schools/programs where teachers in various classrooms may be exploring and finding new apps-are there systems set up to share about these discoveries with others?

So many apps, so little time- thanks for sharing tips from your workflow about these questions.

I’m often asked to provide lists of apps for schools, districts or teachers. This is tricky because of the wide variety of apps. In general, I’d say that there are way more skill and drill type apps available (flashcards, letter games, puzzles, etc…) most likely because they are simple for app developers (non-educators most often) to create. Apps that support higher-order think skills are less in numbers. I think the most important thing for a teacher to consider is what they want their students to accomplish using the app and then consider whether an app is actually the best resource for this learning experience. I like to point admins and teachers to the SAMR model when asking them this and then try to help them discern is the are using the app as simply a substitution for something they have always done or if they are able to use the app to help redefine the learning task.

Read the rest of this entry…

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Today is the official launch of EdReach.us, the educational media network, a collaboration by educators from all over the United States.

Why EdReach?

Do we really need another Educational blog? There are so many others out there- aren’t there enough?

Well, that is true, there are a lot of voices out there. So many voices. So many, it seems that it’s getting harder and harder to hear them, harder to cut through the volume and rate of information, harder to even keep up with well-known colleagues, and harder to be heard.

EdReach.us aims to cut through this.

The EdReach Educational Media Network (EdReach.us) aims to gather these voices together, and create one stream of educational news, blogs, commentary, and interactive media that highlights the innovation, highlights the ideas, highlights the cutting-edge best practices that are happening in the world’s schools every day. Read the rest of this entry…

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Creating a Statewide Learning Community

Mark Your Calendar – May 4, 2010!
That’s when a statewide summit will be held to engage and network local school leaders, teachers, government and policy makers, corporate and civic leaders in building a common language and vision for using 21st Century Skills as a change agent for education in Ohio. The event will recognize and celebrate Ohio’s position as a “21st Century Leadership State” and begin the process for developing a comprehensive 21st Century Skills educational implementation plan.
It is our goal to facilitate Ohio’s move to become a 21st Century …

Read the full story »



Toby Fischer (@futureofedu) sent me the link to this website earlier today. Follow Ohio’s path as it begins to explore and define what 21st Century Skills mean from the perspective of: curriculum & instruction, learning environments, professional development, standards & assessment and systems planning.

Posted via web from brueckj23′s posterous

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[SWF]http://brueckei.org/jsb_content/currere_engage/pinar.swf, 440, 260[/SWF]

Full Screen Version of Learning Object

This semester I’m enrolled in an independent study with Dr. Lisa Lenhart and Dr. Jennifer Milam from the University of Akron. The course is Introduction to Curriculum Theory, one which isn’t currently offered as a part of the College of Education’s Curriculum and Instruction doctoral program. The main text we are using to guide our discussion of curriculum theory is William F. Pinar‘s 2004 work, “What is Curriculum Theory?” From the course syllabus:

Curriculum theory is, then, about discovering and articulating, for oneself and with others, the educational significance of the school subjects for self and society in the ever-changing historical moment. As a consequence, curriculum theory rejects the current “business-minded” school reform, with its emphasis on test scores on standardized examinations, academic analogues to “the bottom line” (i.e., “profit”). It rejects the miseducation of the American public” (Pinar, 2004, p. 16).

As I’ve been working my way through the text, one of the concepts I’m trying to understand more deeply is the significance of the re-conceptualization of curriculum studies. After reading the first few chapters, it’s quite clear that Pinar has some issues with the historical context of curriculum theory. In fact, he is very intent on voicing his opinion regarding the complexities and contradictions of curriculum theory and practice as most educators know it.

Read the rest of this entry…

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eTech Ohio is hosting the 2010 Ohio Educational Technology Conference — an idea factory for P-20 education — from February 1-3, 2010 in Columbus, Ohio. On Tuesday, February 2, 2010 from 3:45 PM – 4:30 PM, Ohio educators Toby Fischer (@futureofedu) and Jeremy Brueck (@brueckj23) will be leading a panel discussion titled “Leading for 21st Century Learning: What Every Ohio Adminstrator Needs to Know.”

Panelists we hope to include:

Description from online conference planner:

As Ohio becomes the 14th state to join the Partnership for 21st century skills, what does this mean for district leaders? This interactive session will showcase promising practices, stories, and behaviors linked to 21st Century leadership success. Topics include ethical leadership, sustaining a culture of learning, professional development, and promoting instructional and curriculum excellence.

Read the rest of this entry…

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Over the past 3 months I’ve found myself turning more and more to my Personal Learning Network on Twitter for reading recommendations. While RSS and my Google Reader account has significantly decreased the amount of time I spend filtering through various websites in search of interesting and relevant articles, I think that adding Twitter to the mix helps me make even better use of my time. For example, I came across this tweet from @willrich45 the other morning.

@willrich45

Pupils to study Twitter and blogs? Twitter and blogs caught my eye like flashing lights, plus I figured an article worth a tweet from @willrich45 is most often worth the time investment.

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An interesting Op Ed piece appeared in The New York Times today titled, Reading Test Dummies. The author is E. D. Hirsch Jr., who is best known for his work in the area of cultural literacy. Dr. Hirsch has written several books, his most recent being The Knowledge Deficit (2006). He also is the founder of the Core Knowledge Foundation, a non-profit research organization.

Hirsch prefaces his piece by pulling an Obama quote from a recent speech on education reform. Specifically, the one where the President calls for children to have the skill set to do more than just fill in bubbles on Scan-tron sheets. Hirsch then takes a minute to make a case that standardized tests aren’t all bad, but rather the U.S. educational system takes the wrong approach, indicating that children are often asked to read passages that are not “knowledge neutral” and given randomly to students with out a context.
Children are asked to read and then answer multiple-choice questions about such topics as taking a hike in the Appalachians even though they’ve never left the sidewalks of New York, nor studied the Appalachians in school.
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This is a personal blog. The resources, information and views presented on Raised Digital are solely the opinion of Jeremy S. Brueck, and are not meant to reflect the views of my employer.


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Why Raised Digital?

Today’s students were born digital but those responsible for their education were not. Youngsters arrive at school in tune with the social context and experience the Web offers. Children thrive when teachers find ways to educate them in a more flexible, hypertext manner. This space focuses on development of and support for teachers in their use of technology as they cultivate 21st century content knowledge and skills in their students.