HTML Example: A Hyperlink

The author Donald J. Sobol first published his adventures of boy super sleuth “Encyclopedia” Brown in 1963. All 29 books in this popular series presented the reader with a set of short mysteries, each including factual disparities somewhere within. Young readers were encouraged to read the text closely to try to identify the “slip-up” that breaks the case and then turn to the “Answers” section in the back of the book to verify their finding.

An important part of writing in digital spaces is the use of “hyperlinks.” In their most basic form, a “link,” or hyperlink is word, phrase or image on a Web page that instructs a computer to move to another relevant Web page. Much like Sobol’s “Answers” section linked readers to the facts that solved each case, hyperlinked writing provides links that are pertinent to a piece of writing on the web and help to strengthen the writing by providing direct access back to source documents and related materials for the writer’s audience. Read the rest of this entry…

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Learning is about so much more than earning points and bean counting.

This post was brought upon by the needs that the #UAEdTech learning community have expressed, is responsive and reflective in nature and a model of the type of transparent learning that the course instructors are asking you to engage in throughout the semester. It is also a model of the type of reflection, scaffolding and re-teaching that you will need to provide to your future students in your future classroom.  

Over this past weekend, I received multiple emails regarding the Week 2 grading for Assignment 1.0 Networked Professional Learning. All of the emails contained some variation of a similar theme, “I just saw my Week 2 grade and I am just wondering where I lost points?” As I reflected on the questions being asked and thought about my response, I felt it would be best to address them in an open manner for the benefit of the entire #UAEdTech learning community.

I understand that the format of Assignment 1.0 may be a bit new and different from the other experiences that you have had in school to date. I also understand that it will take some time to get use to this style of learning. The points and feedback you have received to date reflect that you are learning and show room for growth. This is perfectly normal. If you’re a points person (I’m clearly not and firmly believe that we can assess learning with a variety of data beyond just statistics), the total points this week actually account for a mere 7% of the total points you can earn for just this assignment during the semester.

Do not look at the percentage you received on this 1/14th of Assignment 1.0 as a failure. It is certainly far from that. If you have to use the word FAIL, I hope you look at it as your First Attempt In Learning. With this lens,  you will see that you have 13 more weeks to show your learning and growth as a Networked Professional Learner. The points for the Week 2 assignment simply establish a baseline of your understanding. While your baseline may be lower than where you would like it, a review of the rubric will  probably tell you that the grade you received for Week 2 falls within the Satisfactory or higher range, so there is no need for alarm.

A few things to think about as we forge on through the semester. I think they’ll be helpful for you. Read the rest of this entry…

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2014 OSBA Capital Conference

Session Handout

It’s About Learning, Not Shiny Tech Tools

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 | 2:00 PM

Districts are investing lots of money in digital technologies. But if it’s about the learning, not the tools, what does that mean for students? What does it mean for teachers and administrators? What does it mean for the role of the board? This highly-interactive discussion will focus on student agency and empowerment, global connection and collaboration, and deeper, more cognitively-complex thinking tasks. Within those areas, what should board members be looking for? What questions should they be asking? How can they help support innovative efforts? We’ll hit all of this and more.

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2014 OSBA Capital Conference

Session Handout

Modernizing Education for Student Success

Monday, November 10, 2014 | 9:00 AM

In this day and age, it feels like education is not in the hands of the true stakeholders: the students.  Let’s discuss ways as educators, administrators, school board members, etc. that we can get education back to where it belongs. We will discuss ways that we can move away from the Industrial Age of education and take education and modernize it for our the benefit of our students and communities.

 

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Sprouts and STEM: Growing What We Know About Early Childhood Education and Technology

Digital tools are playing an increasingly important role in classroom learning.  In order to design high-quality learning experiences for our youngest students, early childhood educators must be informed and judicious in the manner in which they integrate these technologies.  Join Jeremy Brueck as he explores appropriate and innovative ways to integrate technology into classrooms in support of young children’s learning.  Drawn on his own research, child development theory, and developmentally appropriate  practice as a foundation, Brueck will demonstrate how digital tools can enhance early learning, support teaching goals, and improve teaching practice.  Brueck will discuss the role of digital tools in:

  • Creating engaging and educational experiences for young children that balance with other hands-on learning experiences
  • Helping educators with management, organization, and professional learning
  • Building teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge

Keynote Presentation Slides

Breakout Session Slides

Breakout Session Resources

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digitallearningday

Recently, the Ohio Board of Regents asked me to hold a webinar as part of Ohio’s celebration of Digital Learning Day. Today, I finalized the details of this event and I have shared them below. I’m looking forward to this webinar, as I have the opportunity to present with an outstanding second grade teacher from Green Local Schools, Ms. Kourtney Denning. Kourtney was part of my Digital Text Initiative back in the 2011-2012 school year and continues to be a leader in the classroom when it comes to digital pedagogies. Please join us for what promises to be an interesting and entertaining event!

Read the rest of this entry…

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2014oetcX_final

I haven’t been blogging much lately. I know this, but I don’t think that it is so much a reflection of me not sharing my ideas and thoughts, as much as it is a reflection of my more focused effort to complete my dissertation. After working on that as regularly as I can, I just don’t feel like writing blog posts, and I think I’m ok with that for now. At least until the big paper is complete. But, in the meantime, that doesn’t mean that I’m not thinking through all the great questions posed to me by the thoughtful and  reflective individuals in my personal learning network.

Those questions keep coming and increasingly, I’ve allowed myself to respond within the confines of 140 characters. Right or wrong, that’s the time I have at this point to offer. I hope that changes soon. I want it to change. And maybe it will, starting today. I received an email from a trusted colleague in regards to #OETCx, “the official unconference” of the Ohio Educational Technology Conference. Like myself, this person has been involved in the planning and evolution of #OETCx since it started last year. It was a succinct message:

We have a schedule for both rooms this year? Seems a little antithesis to the whole unconference thing…

Read the rest of this entry…

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iPad 3G running on 3

So you’re coming to DigiCamp for Teachers and you’re planning to bring your own Apple mobile device, but which apps should you load up prior to camp to make your time on the beautiful University of Akron campus productive? Look no further, I’m here to share with you all the apps that the Center for Literacy has loaded on their “loaner” iPads and iPod Touches. While we made ever effort to pick as many free apps as possible, sometimes it’s just worth paying to get a high-quality app.

iPad Apps

iPod Touch Apps

Cross-posted on Digi-Camp for Teachers

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Session Description
We are in a new age, a new time and we need to create new places and spaces that nurture mobile content in the richly literate classroom. From a pedagogical perspective, we are adrift as mobile devices make their way into the hands of our children and spread ever more widely into everyday life. Although a growing body of research points to the potential of mobile computing for influencing children’s emerging literacy skills, empirical studies on mobile learning in early elementary are rare. Even less is known about developing learning spaces that can support our youngest mobile students.

As technology becomes ubiquitous, questions of appropriateness, physical attributes of devices, placement, and usage patterns need to be answered. Young children need age and developmentally appropriate physical environments that are safe, nurturing, and supportive of child-directed play and learning. Active, creative play and exploration is central to healthy child development. The physical environment, including its ambiance, layout, acoustics, lighting, equipment and furnishings has a profound impact on children’s learning and behavior.

Without a doubt, designing a high quality, developmentally and culturally appropriate environment for children, whether for learning or for play, is a highly complex process. Join in a conversation around building spaces that support the elementary child as a unique individual; are child controlled; encourage exploration, experimentation, and risk taking; encourage critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving. Discuss the implications of these type of spaces as young learners transition to secondary schools.

Conversational Practice
User-centered design is a process that focuses on the needs, wants, and limitations of end users of a product. Rather than forcing users to modify their behavior to accommodate the product, user-centered design attempts to optimize the product around how users can, want, or need to use the product. As we envision and design new spaces for our youngest learners, this user-center approach is critical. In the context of our conversation, user-centered design will become a multi-stage problem solving process that requires participants to analyze our current schools and classrooms, envision new spaces for learning and create rich media objects that will transform our conversation into eBook that can be shared widely with educators so that we may test the validity of our assumptions in real world cases.

2 com

iPad2, Xoom, Playbook, iPod Touch, netbook, iPhone, Chromebook, the list never stops. Everyday a new device is hyped, overhyped and pushed into our consciousness by a barrage of media and market glam. In the past 6 months I’ve fielded countless question from school leaders and teachers about the new world order of computing devices.

  • “Which is better?”
  • “Which runs faster?”
  • “Which has the best apps?”
  • “Which is cheapest?”
  • “How do we go 1:1?”

Aside from the constant questions, I also hear some horrifying statements.

  • “We’ve got $30,000 to spend and we’re going to buy every teacher in the district an iPad.”
  • “The teachers want iPads for teaching so we’re going to get them some.”

It’s got to stop. Enough already because I’m about to go EDTECHHULK on somebody.


But I won’t.

Instead, I’m going to go all Mr. T up in hurr.

I pity the fool who thinks it’s about the devices. Read the rest of this entry…

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Disclaimer

This is a personal blog. The resources, information and views presented on Raised Digital are solely the opinion of Jeremy S. Brueck, and are not meant to reflect the views of my employer.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

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Why Raised Digital?

Today’s students were born digital but those responsible for their education were not. Youngsters arrive at school in tune with the social context and experience the Web offers. Children thrive when teachers find ways to educate them in a more flexible, hypertext manner. This space focuses on development of and support for teachers in their use of technology as they cultivate 21st century content knowledge and skills in their students.